An Earth Day Walking Tour

MITOS

An Earth Day Walking Tour

Earth Day is a day to take action for the environmental movement in the ways that you can. It’s a day to attend events and engage in dialogues, find ways to reuse resources, or learn ways seemingly small decisions make a big impact. It’s also a great day to step outside and see the world we’re fighting to protect for everyone.

Earth Day is a day to take action for the environmental movement in the ways that you can. It’s a day to attend events and engage in dialogues, find ways to reuse resources, or learn ways seemingly small decisions make a big impact. It’s also a great day to step outside and see the world we’re fighting to protect for everyone. Take a walking tour or make a stop or two to enjoy the environment in MIT’s backyard and explore some conservation, pollution remediation, and open space success stories.

hand drawn map of walking tour

  1. Start at MIT

  2. Killian Court

    1. A staple in the MIT experience, Killian Court is a lovely green area where students can meet between classes, relax on the grass, or look over the esplanade. It’s only a few minutes away from most dorms and serves as a great place to spend a break from classes.

  3. The Hive at MIT

    1. The Hive is a collaborative project between MITOS, UA Sustain, and MIT Grounds Services. It aims to bring the community together for sustainability education, collaborative thinking, and relaxation. Sit on some of the colorful chairs placed at The Hive and enjoy the view or explore the containers to see if you can identify the native sprouting plants.

  4. Charles River Esplanade

    1. Stroll along the esplanade, a 17-mile stretch of land along the banks of the Charles River, to arrive at some of these other locations on the list. (The Charles River is also an environmental success story, with the Clean Charles River Initiative vastly improving water quality).

    2. Wonderful place for a run, a picnic, or to have fun in a hammock.

  5. Boston Public Garden

    1. Central to the city of Boston and a beautiful botanical park, is Boston's Public Garden. Normally thought of in conjunction with Boston Common, they are two separate entities with a distinct boundary between them at Charles Street. In the spring you can use foot-pedal powered boats, available for rent in its lagoon, to explore the area

  6. Boston Common

    1. Boston Common is Boston’s most famous public park and the oldest city park in the United States (1634). Now, it’s used as a public park for formal or informal gatherings, or just to enjoy the park and its surroundings.

  7. Rose Kennedy Greenway

    1. Free WiFi too! Bring a book (or eBook) and enjoy the reprieve from city life

    2. The Greenway is made up of 15 acres of vibrant, public parkland. The Greenway came to life after the Big Dig relocated an elevated highway underground, opening community space that connects previously cut off neighborhoods and the waterfront, engaging the community in a vibrant green space.

    3. The Greenway is a series of four parks within a corridor of land that extends about one mile through downtown Boston. Visit the Gateway Pavilion here for ferry tickets to go to the Harbor Islands National Park

  8. Boston Harbor Islands National Park

    1. You don't have to head to the suburbs for a day in nature. Take a short ferry ride to one of Boston's many harbor islands. Enjoy hiking trails, fishing and picnic areas, and lots more. The islands are home to a rich diversity of plant, animal, and marine life, supported by the protected National Park status of the islands.

    2. A cluster of 34 islands

 

OUTSIDE BOSTON:

  1. Belle Isle Marsh Reservation

    1. This 152-acre reservation is all that is left in Boston of the salt marshes that were once abundant along the Massachusetts coastline. This spot sustains a truly awesome amount of plant and sea life. Soak it all in as you stroll along the raised boardwalk.

  2. Fruitlands Museum

    1. One of the first outdoor museums in America, at Fruitlands visitors discover the stories, experiments and ideals of the Alcotts, Shakers, utopians, artists, and Native peoples. The museum and its supporters also serve as stewards for the land and native plants and animals that populate it.

    2. Fruitlands four galleries, singular collections, over 200 pastoral acres, trails and vistas stir the imagination

  3. Tower Hill Botanic Garden

    1. Tower Hill Botanic Garden’s 171-acre property with garden tours every Sunday. At Tower Hill, you can “stroll the gardens and grounds to explore nature, take a Contemplative break from work or share some quality time with your family. Bring a picnic, or have a tasty lunch of light, healthy fare at TWIGS Café.”